Phonograph

prozdvoices:

said:

I think “who was phone” in your Viktor Vasko voice would be hilarious, don’t you agree?

image

Apologies to Tracy Butler.  Everything about this is CLEARLY anachronistic, especially the term MAKING OUT, but shh, shh, that’s okay.

Viktor and Rocky are characters from the webcomic Lackadaisy, and if you haven’t read it, you really should.

The original creepypasta can be read along here.

I’m not quite sure what I just listened to, but it’s hilarious.

Imagery

Hmm.  Looks rather better this way.

Hmm.  Looks rather better this way.

(Source: claudia-cher)

Imagery

skidar:

Dorian “Zib” Zibowski #66 -Skidar
One of my favorite characters from my favorite comic, Lackadaisy by the brilliant Tracy Butler. 

This is wonderful - thank you!

skidar:

Dorian “Zib” Zibowski #66 -Skidar

One of my favorite characters from my favorite comic, Lackadaisy by the brilliant Tracy Butler. 

This is wonderful - thank you!

Question & Answer

So does every dude have a thing with Mitzi?? Cos seriously
asker photo Anonymous

She’s fixated on her deceased husband.  She has history with Zib.  She made an attempt at something with Wick (though it didn’t go at all as planned), and Rocky chases her approbation with unsettling application of zeal (arguably, something he’d do for anyone who’d give him the time of day). Certainly not all of her associations (Viktor, Mordecai, Asa, Freckle to name a few) have a romantic slant, but that’s beside the point.  Mitzi is a central character who pursues and maintains a complex of relationships in a criminal, male-dominated business.  It’s rather the crux from which the story branches.  
Does that seem problematic?

Question & Answer

Have you ever thought about trying to make lackadaisy your full time job? I'm not saying you should, since you seem to be enjoying what you're doing, but I was just wondering if the thought had ever crossed your mind. Sorry if that question seems a bit abrupt and rude.
asker photo Anonymous

I would like nothing more than to do it full time.  That doesn’t fit very well into the realm of financial reality, though.

Question & Answer

This is probably a weird question, but do the characters have any set sexuality? I always kind of headcanon Serafine as being into the lady cats...
asker photo Anonymous

By and large, she is.

Question & Answer

Considering the whole Ivy Pepper thing, I thought it would be good to ask before I went ahead with this: Would it be all right if I used the name "Lacy Hardt" for my Drag name? How would you want to be credited?
asker photo Anonymous

Yes.  It’s conceivably a real name.  I can’t really claim ownership of it in an unrelated, non-commercial context and couldn’t very well demand you seamlessly slip intellectual property notifications into conversation or something   If you have a web presence under your drag identity, I would appreciate a small note of acknowledgment. Otherwise, don’t worry about it. Thanks for asking!

Question & Answer

Are the characters' birthdays posted anywhere?
asker photo Anonymous

They are listed in the character section of the LackaWiki and were marked in the calendars that used to be available (and which should be back again for 2015). Here’s most of them:

Rocky - December 19, 1904
Ivy - May 20, 1909
Freckle - March 10, 1909
Mitzi - September 25, the near side of the turn of the century. She swears.
Wick - January 11, 1895
Viktor - April 16, 1886
Asa - August 19, 1884
Mordecai - March 28, 1899
Serafine - sometime between October 25 and November 1, 1902
Nico - July-ish, 1900
Zib - February 15, and about as likely to divulge his age as Mitzi
Atlas - January 3, 1884
Nina - May 13, 1879
Lacy - September 6, 1904
Dom - June 21, 1890

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bobiniesofbiniwood:

Ivy Bobini by Biniwood

I’m touched by how well it captures Ivy - the dark little insinuation of a cat, easily taken for a shadow were it not her luminous moon eyes.  She died last month.  I miss her so.Reblogging this to thank Jessica for so kindly offering to make this, and to give a shout out to her deft and adorable handiwork. Her other creations can be found here.

bobiniesofbiniwood:

Ivy Bobini by Biniwood

I’m touched by how well it captures Ivy - the dark little insinuation of a cat, easily taken for a shadow were it not her luminous moon eyes.  She died last month.  I miss her so.

Reblogging this to thank Jessica for so kindly offering to make this, and to give a shout out to her deft and adorable handiwork. Her other creations can be found here.

Question & Answer

How did you motivate yourself to start your comic? I'm trying to start a comic right now, but I keep worrying about dumb things like art thieves and people who in general won't like it. How did you get past these things and begin?
asker photo Anonymous

Well, nothing ventured, nothing gained, right? 

Theft and haters should probably be the least of your worries at this stage, honestly. Focus your energy on telling a good story, developing an artistic approach that complements the story, communicating effectively with your dialogue and your page layouts, working out a production schedule, and just hunkering down and doing the work (which will probably amount to more blood, sweat and tears than you can prepare for, assuming you haven’t done this before). Those are the things that are really worth troubling yourself over because that’s ultimately how the undertaking becomes fulfilling…they’re the satisfying meaty bits of a creative diet…the marrow even…
…the colorful, delightsome dehydrated marshmallows in the soggy, beige compost of your breakfast cereal…not altogether unlike Life cereal, but not exactly Life, which is a shame because that would really drive this metaphor home…like the Kool Aid man through your living room wall…
(Help me)

There will be people who won’t like your comic. It’s not hard to distinguish thoughtful criticism from ridicule and resentment, though. Filter out the former and sift through it for useful information. As to the latter, well, electronic outrage from anonymous assholes is rather a fact of life in this day and age, isn’t it? No matter who you are, what you do, what your art looks like, how you write, or what you choose to write about, there are going to be people out there who’ll glean some perverse satisfaction from telling you how much they hate it. You can’t spend your life hiding away from inevitable nonsense like that, though, and trying to tiptoe around it by making everyone happy is limiting, sterilizing, and equally futile. Come to grips with the existence of the vitriol, know that along the way at least a little of it will pelt you in the face, and though it will quite probably sting, understand that it’s often more about the individual it’s coming from and their personal issues than it is about your work…then move along because other things are more important. Do the comic for your own gratification foremost. Do it how you want to do it. Do it genuinely for your love of the art, the process, the story, the characters. When you love it, it’ll sustain your interest and will demand to be done with integrity. The quality of your output will reflect that - work really shines when you’ve loved it so much it could kill you - and the quality of the feedback you get will tend to coincide.

Art thievery is a pain in the ass, to be sure, and while it can make you feel like crumpling into a heap, lashing out, setting the internet on fire, becoming a cave hermit on impulse, crying and rage-vomiting all at the same time, incidents are fairly uncommon. When they do happen, they’re usually minor and the internal melodrama is quickly replaced with resolve to continue along and address the problem as best you can. Someone reposting something you made and taking credit for it, slapping your art on a set of table coasters and putting it up for sale in an Etsy store, compiling it with a bunch of other things into a slipshod publication or app - these things happen, they’re vexing, but they aren’t career-ending catastrophes and they’re usually not particularly detrimental to anything but your pride. For rarer but more heinous situations involving revenues and corporations that should know better, the art community at large is usually quick to come to the outspoken defense and aid of artists who have clearly been wronged. You can take sensible precautions as well, like including your copyright information on everything and registering trademarks if you’re making a business of your art.

Yes, conceivably something terrible and personally devastating could happen, but you have to weigh for yourself whether all the good that can come of putting your work out there - the people you’ll share something with, the friends you’ll make, the connections you’ll establish with other artists, the things you stand to learn, the freelance and job opportunities you’ll create for yourself - is worth the risk. I’ve had my share of art theft headaches and heartaches, but if I had to make the choice again, I wouldn’t flinch in decision to share my work online. It has made all the difference in my life and career as an artist, as it has for many others.

Well, that was a lot of words.  Sorry. I hope it contains something useful. Good luck with your comic!